22 Jump Street

22-jump-street-uk-poster

Release: Friday, June 13, 2014

[Theater]

We gon’ sip Bacardi like it’s yo birthday. . . .

And beer. And vodka. And octopus ink. And a few other unknown substances.

Another year and another Jump Street movie, only this time it seems that even the suits of Sony Pictures felt comfortable with loosening their ties and collars as writers Phil Lord and Chris Miller (yes, the guys who brought the world the first edition and also The Lego Movie) stepped forward and appeared eager to dispense with formalities and take the sequel to one of the more surprising comedies of 2012 to a whole new level.

22 Jump Street successfully clears the first (and biggest) hurdle of being not just a sequel, but a sequel to a comedy. History has proven a good many films tend to lose their luster once sequel-ized; a franchise risks losing its identity by forcing one too many installments; studios forgetting where they started because they are blinded by the color green. Shameless cash grabs are unavoidable, with remakes and sequels being the greatest offenders. While we love being entertained what we love more is having the entertainment continue for as long as possible. In a modern context we know this to be true because Netflix has been invented. It’s alive, and it knows you plan to watch more of it. And more, and more.

This compulsion helps to explain certain and often unnecessary theatrical releases: what was once good ought to continue being good. In theory this might be possible but rarely does it actually happen in practice.

Highly-anticipated 22 Jump Street continues to follow Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum in their respective roles as Schmidt and Jenko after the events of their last bromantic escapade. This time around, everything is different. . . . .only, it’s the same. In fact it’s almost exactly the same, which is the entire point. We get more of the undeniable chemistry between these two relatively capable albeit low-ranking badges, more of the outrageous scatalogical humor (that I apparently had a problem with in this quite frankly terrible review of 21 Jump Street) and more of the drug-seeking, youth-mingling awkwardness. The only things that really are interchangeable are the setting — instead of high school the boys get to go back to (or really, pretend to attend) college — and the drugs; this time the main threat is in the form of the totally-21st-Century narcotic ‘WHY-PHY’ (because crack and cocaine, that stuff’s for old guys. . .).

Team Lord/Miller strikes again by taking advantage of where they stand now with Schmidt, Jenko, Captain Dickson (Ice Cube) et al in 2014. The duo are keenly aware that sequels breed familiarity, a fondness inherent with the characters the moment they first appear on screen. And if there’s one thing the film supremely achieves, it’s gripping the bromance by its love-handles and holding on tightly. The film beautifully embellishes upon the buffoonish friendship between former enemies-turned-bro’s, simultaneously proving that Tatum is able to adapt his talents for this kind of material and that Hill is in as fine a form as he’s ever been comedically.

Their odd relationship is put to the test as their latest assignment requires them to go undercover at the fictitious MC State, thereby forcing them to adjust to an environment in which neither of them have any experience. The ultimate goal, in effect, is to gain the trust of a select few students in an effort to expose and stop the drug ring that’s present there. Where Jenko rediscovers parts of himself in football player and frat brother Zook (Wyatt Russell), Schmidt finds that he doesn’t blend into the hard-partying culture of college as well as his partner. Jealousy sets in. However, he does manage to find a friend in art student Maya (Amber Stevens), but this later turns out to be one of the most unfortunate discoveries of his career.

Jam-packed with outrageous comedy and unrelenting stupidity at almost every turn, 22 Jump Street truly feels like 21 Jump Street: The College Edition. Yes, the shenanigans occasionally dive into the realm of the ridiculous like a twentysomething into the nearest bathroom after a bender, but the level of self-awareness manages to balance out the equation. The end result is a highly enjoyable and surprisingly confident follow-up.

helmet-fuckage

3-5Recommendation: Fans of the original (film, that is) will find plenty to love about the fact that they get to jump again with Hill and Tatum. The pair’s chemistry is even more apparent this time around, and while the jokes and sexual innuendo is no more intelligent or surprising than other films of its ilk, its willingness to acknowledge almost every cliché before, during or after they happen is likely to turn a few more thumbs up than would otherwise be possible if played as a more straightforward story. However, it remains to be seen whether viewers of the 1980s police procedural starring a very young Johnny Depp are willing to latch on to the idea of the show being remade at all.

Rated: R

Running Time: 110 mins.

Quoted: “Yo Sleepy, wassup homie? Everyone saying that Sleepy, he like the Mexican Wolverine!”

All content originally published and the reproduction elsewhere without expressed written consent of the blog owner is prohibited.

Photo credits: http://www.impawards.com; http://www.imdb.com 

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19 thoughts on “22 Jump Street

  1. Pingback: The 2014 DigiBread Awards | digitalshortbread

  2. Yay! Glad you enjoyed this one, too, dude! Right up there with Neighbors as my favorite comedy of the year (so far). Hill and Tatum just have this legendary bromance. I’m so glad they decided to reboot 21 Jump Street as such a self-aware comedy. It just…works. And I LOVE the end credits for this. Pure brilliance. Great review, my friend!

    • Wasn’t their bromance just amazing?? I think it all hit a climax in the psychologist’s office scene — “he’s literally reaching out to you.” hahah!! Love it.

      Thanks so much for the kind words, I had a ball with this. Writing the review was tricky because I couldn’t stop laughing thinking back on it. 😉

      • Lol! You know a comedy’s done something right when you can’t stop laughing even afterward. 🙂 And GOD I hope we get to see Tatum and Hill together in a comedy again.

    • hahah right on man. Right on.

      This movie was great. Much of the same as before, but as the writers knew, that’s not a problem whatsoever. Really loved the fact that they managed to make it still feel fresh despite having the exact same premise. Speaks to the quality of the direction. Had a lot of fun with this man, good to know you did too.

      • Man what a great question!!! If only I could remember alllllll the ones they showed! lol.

        I think, of the ones i remember, I would like to see Bible/Sunday School made. haha that has such offensive potential. And I love it. What about you?

    • I surely think you’ll have yourself a good time Mark. It seems to have pretty much won everyone over. Everyone who enjoyed themselves enough in the first, that is! 🙂

      Agree on the chemistry between Hill and Tatum. That is definitely one thing that is better here, I will say that outright

  3. Laughed so much during this and just had a great time overall. The first is still better, but this one comes pretty damn close. Good review.

    • I can’t really remember much from the old one man! haha but I’d be willing to agree if I only saw it recently again. Which I totally should. This thing was a riot. Glad you had a good time too bud.

  4. Audiences and critics alike have praised this film. But they did the original too and that was fine enough but nothing special.. I’ll see this at some point. Enjoyed your review.

    • If the films really are identical (which they pretty much are) I see no reason why this film won’t fade from my memory relatively quickly as 21 Jump Street did, but that’s not to say I didn’t have a blast at the time. I don’t recall much from the original. This was a great time. But yeah, it may not have staying power

  5. Have been unsure about the prospect of a sequel since its announcement, but it seems to have gone over well with most people. Enjoyed the first one, maybe I should give part two a go. Great review Tom!

    Adam.

    • Indeed it has man, I wasn’t too fond of the idea at first either but as it turns out, the final product is righteously funny! Possibly better than the first, and I don’t jump to those kinds of conclusions very often. 🙂

      Thanks man

    • 😀 Ah thanks Mikey! Makes me feel slightly better. I don’t understand why I wrote that one the way I did though. None of my argument makes sense. I just bitched about the quality of the jokes. Lol. I’m not sure what else I was expecting out of it, but I loved both of these movies.

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