The Best Man Holiday

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Release: Friday, November 15, 2013

[Theater]

Reunited — and it feels so good!!!

For a film that’s been released nearly forty days removed from it’s wintery afflatus, The Best Man Holiday sure knows how to ring in the holiday spirit in very appropriate, and surprisingly emotional doses. Director Malcolm D. Lee (Undercover Brother) gathers up another impressive ensemble cast in. . . *whew, here we go:*

Morris Chestnut, Taye Briggs, Terrence Howard, Regina Hall, Harold Perrineau Jr., Nia Long, Sanaa Lathan, Melissa DeSousa, John Michael Higgins, Eddie Cibrian, and Monica Calhoun — for a sequel that is now 14 years in the making.

As a follow-up to Lee’s hit The Best Man, it might be difficult to think of this film as anything more than a shameless cash-grab. However, one would be wrong to dismiss it thusly; there is some reward in seeing all the guys back together for Christmas, gathering at Lance (Chestnut) and Mia (Calhoun)’s gorgeous mansion for a celebration of life, love and Michael Jackson impressions. It’s certainly not free of every cliche, every convenience and every seasonal trope you can think of, but that doesn’t necessarily doom this flick.

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Coming into any sequel blindly can make that experience tough to sit through without getting too confused or losing interest; fortunately because this is a feel-good movie and the ensemble cast has strong chemistry — it wouldn’t surprise me one bit if half the time Terrence Howard isn’t even in character while cameras are rolling — the story actually moves along at a comfortable pace, enough to make certain loose ends easy to ignore (again, if you’re coming in without seeing the original).

Years removed from a bitter rivalry that sent Lance and Harper (Diggs) on their separate ways, Harper finds himself growing desperate to reclaim his status as a successful, published author having struggled for years to do so. His latest idea is to track down his former best friend Lance for a biography since he’s retiring from a career playing for the New York Giants. With encouragement from family and friends Harper and his wife accept the Sullivan’s invitation to join them for a Christmas celebration, but Harper needs to find a way to put his and his buddy’s differences aside for the sake of him getting. . .well, paid.

Because, you know. . . nothing says brotherhood more than exploiting your friends for financial gain, especially during the time of Jesus’ birth. Call it a Christmas un-miracle.

The Best Man Holiday

Over the course of a weekend (?) friends will bump heads and bump uglies. . . and one soon-to-be-mommy’s bump gets bigger. Indeed, you do have the whole stocking of good feelings (and some bad) in this two-hour-long comedy. Most of the scene-stealing moments come from Terrence Howard’s  Quentin, who is always there to lighten the mood whenever things become too dramatic. But others have their moments as well, including a surprisingly enjoyable Melissa De Sousa as a Real Housewife of Somewhere whose job it is is to be the drama queen. Reading that may cause eyes to roll, but she’s actually quite funny.

Yet, for all of its conviviality, The Best Man Holiday also offers up a more somber subplot that may not have managed to hit so close to home in The Best Man. No spoilers here, but suffice it to say Lee’s follow-up to his successful first ensemble film ends up sending us home with a little bit to think about. In one particular scene Lance is heartbreaking to watch. Fortunately friends like Quentin will always have their boys’ backs, and no moment might be better than when Howard steps forward and cuts the silliness, if just for a second.

The Best Man Holiday is ultimately not anything too special, but it managed to exceed the low expectations I had of it coming in, especially having no previous knowledge of the movie that came before it. I may have broken a personal rule of mine regarding seeing sequels, but no harm, no foul in this case.

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Recommendation: It may feature an all-black cast, but this is certainly not a race-related flick, which really affords more credit to director Malcolm D. Lee. See The Best Man Holiday to get you into the Christmas cheer that much sooner, and also for a very light night out at the theater. It’s a solidly-acted and comfortably-paced two hours filled with some chuckles, a bit of tension and the usual drama amongst life-long friends.

Rated: R

Running Time: 123 mins.

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